Alaska Joins Growing Number of States That Recognize Transfer on Death Deeds

Alaska is the latest state to recognize deeds that transfer ownership of real estate after death without the need for probate.

Dubbed “transfer on death deeds” (or “TOD deeds” for short) in some states, or “beneficiary deeds” in others, the list of U.S. jurisdictions that accept this type of deed through state legislation has grown to 25:

  1. Alaska
  2. Arizona
  3. Arkansas
  4. Colorado
  5. District of Columbia
  6. Hawaii
  7. Illinois
  8. Indiana
  9. Kansas
  10. Minnesota
  11. Missouri
  12. Montana
  13. Nebraska
  14. Nevada
  15. New Mexico
  16. North Dakota
  17. Ohio
  18. Oklahoma
  19. Oregon
  20. South Dakota
  21. Virginia
  22. Washington
  23. West Virginia
  24. Wisconsin
  25. Wyoming

Aside from this, three states – Florida, Michigan, and Texas – recognize “enhanced life estate deeds,” also known as “Lady Bird deeds,” under state common law, which in essence accomplish the same thing as TOD deeds.

How Does a TOD Deed Work?

How does a TOD deed work?  While the logistics vary from state to state, in general the owner of the real estate will sign a new deed which lists the beneficiaries who will inherit the property after the owner dies.  The new deed is then recorded in the applicable public land records (this is usually done at the court house of the county where the real estate is located and costs between $10 and $50).  Then, after the owner dies, their death certificate is recorded in those same public land records, and voilà, the beneficiaries named in the deed become the new owners of the property.

What happens if the owner decides they want to change the beneficiaries of the property after the new deed is recorded?  Then the owner will have to sign and record another TOD deed.

Is a TOD Deed Right for You and Your Family?

While the use of a TOD deed to avoid probate may appear to be a simple process, it is certainly not a “one-size-fits-all” solution to avoid probate and it is certainly not something you should attempt to do on your own because there are so many things that can go wrong.

If you are interested in using a TOD type of deed to avoid probate of your real estate after you die, then consult with an estate planning attorney in the state where your real estate is located to determine if this is the right solution for you and your family.

Photo: Aerial view of Aghileen Pinnacles, Lefthand Valley, Wilderness Area, Alaska; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

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Estate Planning, Sam’s Club Style

Along with buying all of your favorite items in bulk (like a 36-can case of Diet Dr. Pepper!), you can now get your estate plan done at a discount at Sam’s Club.

Yes, you read that right, Sam’s Club is now offering estate planning as well as other legal services.  Well, OK, that’s not exactly accurate.  While the retail warehouse club that is owned by Walmart hasn’t gone out and hired itself a bunch of attorneys and stationed them in its 640+ stores, it has teamed up with LegalZoom to give its business members up to a 25% discount on LegalZoom products.  This includes things like incorporating a business, idea protection, and wills and trusts.

And that’s not all – Sam’s Club business members can also shop for personalized health care plans (in collaboration with Aenta) and payroll services (in collaboration with Execupay).  Who knows what will be next?